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At the Lake

Greetings from the Maine woods.

Actually, that sounds a lot wilder than it really is. After all, I'm posting to out blog, so we're not on the Allagash. We are, in fact, only an hour from the nearest shopping mall, and only twenty minutes from the nearest soft serve. However, though there is dialup web access, it is awfully slow, so I won't be updating the blog until we're home again. If we are slow to post moderated comments this, week, that is why.

So, until we're back in the land of broadband, I'll leave you all to visualize the lapping waters of a peaceful lake, the sound of loons calling over the water, and the smell of pine needles and moss.

There--isn't that nicer than another closely written philosphical post?

Here's to the last hush of summer. May you enjoy it at least as much as I am doing this moment. Blessed be.

Comments

Anonymous said…
Hope you don't waste any Maine time reading that book... how I miss that state.

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