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Where'd Everybody Go?

There's a bumper sticker I really love, that's something like "The people who could really run the country are all busy teaching school."

I'll spare my readers my thoughts on running the country in the midst of this politically-loaded election year. But I will say that the people who normally run this blog have indeed been busy teaching school.

Along the way, however, I did accept an invitation from Erik of Executive Pagan to do a guest blog over there. And for my reflections on teaching as a spiritual activity in general and on teaching spiritual practices in particular you should wander over to Executive Pagan for a visit. (If you don't follow Erik's blog regularly, I recommend it; he's one of the most thoughtful and literate Pagan bloggers I know.)

Erik will be back in the saddle at his own blog at the end of this week; I hope to have some new content up at this site by the end of the weekend, too, perhaps focusing on where nature meets Quaker if the weather holds and Mt. Toby gets to hold it's planned "worshipful hike" on Sunday.

Till then, blessed be.

Comments

Pitch313 said…
Democracy suggest that, in theory, any citizen is competent to take part in governing the country. But, in practice, governing the country offers an almost endless list of examples of the Peter Principle--like cream, we rise to our level of incompetence, then curdle...

See the Wikipedia entry:
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Peter_principle
YogaforCynics said…
Teaching as a spiritual activity...interesting. Most of the teaching I've done has been in elite colleges, where, I didn't feel much of that, despite the occasional student who told me that, thanks to my class, Walt Whitman was now one of her favorite authors. And then, there was the student who said that my comments on a very personal essay helped her realize that she was in an abusive relationship. More recently, though, having left academia, I've taught prisoners and, more recently, recovering drug addicts, some of whom I've helped go from being able to read a handful of nouns to whole sentences. New horizons open up to their eyes, and to mine as well....

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