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Memories and Not

I keep thinking I'm gonna give up memes, and then there will be one I just can't resist. Like this one... Which I flat out stole from Bright Crow (and he, in turn, stole from Igraine).

If you read this, if your eyes are passing over this right now (even if we don't speak often or have never met), please post a comment with a completely made up, fictional memory of you and me.

It can be anything you want - good or bad - but it has to be fake.

When you're finished, post this little paragraph in your blog and see what your friends come up with...
Well? How about it? Anybody remember the time our flea market booth specializing in Hollow Earth artifacts was raided by Atlantean Customs officials? How about the prank with Captain Scarlet and the Voice of the Mysterons? Or that embarassing incident with the yak?

Comments

Nettle said…
You remember that time we all went to the local Rennaisance Faire together? It was a theme weekend - pirates! - so we all had pirate costumes on, since we didn't want to change in the parking lot. You and I were pirate wenches; your partner was going for the Bluebeard look, and mine was more of a Captain Jack Sparrow type. Anyway, as we were driving there, we got into this fender-bender accident with a group of martial arts students on their way to a competition - they all had their uniforms on. The accident wasn't that big a deal, but we all had to stop and exchange insurance information and wait for the police. They were convinced it was our fault, and we thought it was theirs, and we started to argue.

So when the cop finally got there, what he saw was a group of pirates in a shouting match with a bunch of ninjas. We all realized what was going on at the same time and all started laughing at once. The poor policeman had to deal with what must have looked like a bunch of crazy people laughing at themselves by the side of the road.

Remember that? I mean, how could you forget?
Maritzia said…
Remember that time at meeting. A couple of people had spoken, but then was a space of time with quiet. There was the usual little shufflings and coughings that you always hear. But then, suddenly, there was true silence. Everything was still, nothing moved, and the lights shone down from the windows just so.

I looked across the room, and our eyes met. And I knew we were thinking the same thing. This is why we're here.
Steve Hayes said…
Do you remember the time we were dog-sledding across the Sahara tryin g to reach the South Pole before Amundsen and Scott?
Nettle, your story just shows me how wierd my life really is; it reminds me of a story that really did happen to some friends of mine--a poly family active in the SCA. His arm was broken in combat one day, and a knight in shining armor with two period-dressed damsels fluttering over his every move apparently caused quite the stir among the E.R. doctors and nurses.

Which reminds me again of the time my covenmates and I had gone to visit yet another friend at the Vermont commune where she lived, and were all sitting cross-legged, perched on the furniture in her hut while she made us all organic herb tea and my friend Doug played with her rain stick. Suddenly, Kirk grinned up at me and said, "Bet you never thought you'd find yourself here, did you?"

And he was right. There's no way the sheltered little WASP-girl from Suburbia could have predicted how implausible life would have turned out to be--and how rich, how rare, and how strange.

Thanks for the memory.

Maritzia--oh, yes. I remember it well. And it is one of my favorite memories of you, too.

Steve--I can't remember--were those the eight-dog teams or the twelve-dogs? They were all Rhodesian Ridgebacks, of course, for the Sahara leg--chosen for their heat tolerance.

Of course, it all came to naught when they spotted that lion and just had to give chase. (This is why I only race with a team of matched Bichons, to this day.)
Yvonne said…
The Moon hung low over the ocean, tracing a shimmering path over the waves. We were standing on the deck of the J-class yacht Velsheda, watching the moonlight dancing on the water. You sang, a low soft keening, full of joy and yearning at the same time. Suddenly a glistening nose broke the surface of the water, and then another and another. A school of dolphins was keeping pace with the boat. They whistled and squeaked in response to your song.
Deborah said…
Do you remember when we were at a Pagan camp, and we didn't really know each other well, and I got a tick and I was really freaked out and I couldn't get it off and your boyfriend at the time was helping me, and you walked up and found us in what looked for all the world like a compromising position?

You don't? Because I still have the photograph of the black eye you gave me.
Yvonne... how could I ever forget? Especially when it turned out that you had known one of the dolphins in a past life, and still remembered their language. What a peak experience.

Oh, Deborah... nah. You must have me confused with someone else whose boyfriend removed a tic someplace personal. I would never lose my temper over such a thing as that!

Now, there was that time you swiped some of my emergency chocolate stash. I will plead guilty to getting a little physical then. But that counts as self defense, after all! And the swelling went down within a couple of days, just like I said it would... right?
Lone Star Ma said…
Remember how the FBI got our files mixed up and you got arrested because of that little demonstration I had organized with the goat dressed up as Dick Cheney? And then I heard about it on the news and got mad because I had put a lot of time into that demonstration and I went up to the jail to ask you what you thought you were doing claiming my ideas and the FBI realized their mistake and locked me up instead? That was fun.
Ooh, yeah, Lone Star--that was fun. Thanks again--I'd have missed the whole thing if you hadn't tempted me away from my grading for what turned out to be a much more educational experience!

Ah... good times, good times...

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