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Writing Cheerfully on the Web

We're number six! We're number six!

The anthology of Quaker bloggers, Writing Cheerfully on the Web (featuring, among others, yours truly!) made the top ten best-sellers this year at Quaker Books!

OK. Technically, that's way too many exclamation points. I would never let one of my writing students get away with that many exclamation points in a row.

But we're excited around here, and we don't care who knows it! And, if you haven't done so already, how about celebrating the New Year with us by picking up a copy of this (Extreme Bias Alert!) massively magnificent book?

"Topical and thought provoking writing from all the best Quaker Bloggers." (And I quote.)

We're number six! w00t!

Comments

Yewtree said…
Yay! that's awesome, congratulations! Which of your pieces got featured?
Anonymous said…
This is truly great to have real recognition in two such separate communities. Blessings,
David
Beth said…
That's so COOL!!!
Elizabeth said…
Congratulations!
M. Ashley said…
Congratulations! Definitely well-deserved!
Mary Ellen said…
Totally cool! (I haven't, uh, picked up my copy yet -)
Liz Opp said…
To clarify, as someone pointed out to me: the book is #6 of all the new 2009 publications that QuakerBooks carries. But hey, I think that's still mighty fine in my book, if you pardon the pun.

And that ranking doesn't include the 40 or so copies that I've sold directly out of my home.

w00t, indeed!

As for the pieces of Cat's that appear in the book, the two are:

"What Happens in a Quaker Meeting, Part 2: Ministry"
and
"Why Bother with the Bible?"

Thanks, Cat, for everything!

Blessings,
Liz Opp, The Good Raised Up
Liz Opp said…
P.S. for Mary Ellen: I can help get a book into your hands and save you shipping. Contact me!

Blessings,
Liz Opp, The Good Raised Up
See, now, Liz, this willingness to supply books direct is why we're not Number 5, or maybe even 4!

Where's your competitive spirit?

Oh. Yeah. Quaker. Oops. I sorta spaced that part for a sec... *grin*

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