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On Ecstasy

Came across this quote the other day:
Ecstasy doesn't last. But it cuts a groove for something that does last.
--E.M. Forster

Yet another reason to love that writer...

Comments

Anonymous said…
Nice beginning!
Yewtree said…
Good quote. My favourite E.M. Forster quote is "Only connect".
Bright Crow said…
Gorgeous!

Forster is Senior Witch's favorite author, so I'll have to tell her about this one.

Michael

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