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Incapacity

I appear to be completely incapable of writing my impressions of NEYM Sessions this year.

*sigh*

Comments

Kel said…
perhaps you could try drawing, painting or collaging them instead
it always helps me when words fail
Hystery said…
What happened at NEYM? I'm seeing it pop up in blogs and people are disturbed and distressed. What gives?
Pax said…
Perhaps allow it time. This will allow you more time to digest, ponder and work through what is needed.
@ Kel,

You've got a point. I'm not terribly visual--with me, it's all about the words.

But maybe if I can loosen up my attachment to logical sequences, and put out a series of impressions, without worrying too much about ordering them or building to one particular point or conclusion. I think that might work.

@ Hystery: that's a large question! In brief, we set aside our usual agenda to make room for more open-ended worship. What emerged was both good (lots of deep movement of Spirit among us) and less-good (compromises to Quaker process, and some of the strains and fault lines among us that are normally camouflaged by business being made evident).

It was complex enough that I fear that doing justice to one part of it might distort other parts. So I'm struggling.

A sort of word-collage may be the best way to describe it. It will not serve well as journalism, but then, can traditional journalism capture what it feels like to be in a body of people experiencing Spirit moving among us?

@ Fr. Jay: yeah. It kind of feels like I'm still to close to it to bring it all properly into focus.

I'll try my hand at a small snapshot or two over the next few days, and see how that goes.

Thanks.

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